The tech diversity blind spot

 

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Technology makes the world better. It promises to make our lives better. It will free us from work.

Except “The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads”. And tech lives in social bubbles as well as financial ones. Apps designed for silicon Valley don’t always travel to the rest of the USA, apps for Western countries don’t always apply in the East, Facebook and Google aren’t always trusted, VR headsets that don’t work if you wear make up, facial recognition fails if you don’t have the same skin as the webcam software developer, or the photo auto-categorising application developers.

Sometimes the solution is to write technology in another bubble. Brazil, India, China, and many other places have strong home grown technology far more popular than the “global” leaders. Sometimes you expand your bubble, diversified teams, balanced teams, who are smarter than homogeneous teams anyway.

Sometimes you look outside your bubble. I get paid to write software that I will likely never use. Line of business applications, including public interfaces, for government clients. I don’t know what their business is until I ask. I don’t know how they work, or what is important to them. And sometimes I have to ask several times, and sometimes people can never understand or articulate what they do, let alone what they want, even after asking them in several ways. So what makes you uniquely qualified to understand what you do, or what problems you have, or whether those problems are universal?

If you want to know if your intuition applies to the population as a whole, make sure your stakeholders reflect that population, or accept that you are deliberately limiting your audience, because that’s what makes sense to you.

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