Naming things is hard – Microsoft’s Core problem

There are 2 hard problems in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-1 errors.

Microsoft are changing the name of the next iteration of .Net – what was .Net 5.0 is now .Net Core 1.0, and like Rick Strahl, I like the idea, but I’m not find of the timing. Although, as it’s pre-release, anyone writing production code on it was playing with fire anyway. I’m not a big fan of the naming scheme though.

The timing issue is an easy one to solve. I’ve had projects running under placeholder codewords for months whilst the business agreed a proper name. Microsoft has been doing this for years. No-one expected to see Windows Chicago, Windows Threshold or SQL Server Denali. No-one would have expected to ship .Net Sapphire (hey, they’ve admitted that were going after the Ruby developers 😉 ) Everyone knew they were codewords, to be replaced pre-release once marketing figured out what year it was being released – or the regression testers discovered how much old code thought 9 < 7.

The problem I have with it is that ASP.Net Core sounds like part of the family that includes ASP.Net MVC, ASP.Net SignalR or ASP.Net AJAX, whereas it actually replaces the ASP.Net part with its own .Net Core stack. I can’t at the moment think of a better way to name the ASP.Net Core though, without losing the ASP.Net brand.

The naming works when you compare .Net Framework to .Net Core, and to me it’s as natural as when Netscape open sourced Navigator to give us Firefox (once they managed to choose a unique name). It was from some of the same team, and it did the same job, but the new one was leaner, faster and more focused.

Naming things is hard, but starting a new roadmap and resetting expectations is definitely the right thing to do. .Net and the ASP.Net frameworks have needed a decent overhaul for a while to fix the untestable, interdependent ball of mud that the .Net framework install had become. I like the new Core world, with NuGet and Gulp and Grunt, and Github at the heart of development. This is not a Microsoft I thought I’d see when I was at the ScotAlt.Net meetings all those years ago.

Alt.Net is dead. Long live .Net Core.

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