My 2016 in review

2016 was a big year for me. A new job, a new house and the first full year following the John Sonmez blogging course. I got back into public speaking, with my talk about APIs, and the follow-up usable APIs guided conversation at CodeCraftConf, although I missed out on the return of DDD Scotland.

I learned a lot. About leading and mentoring teams, about recruitment, about software design, about code quality, and a lot more things that I never had to consider in previous jobs. Things I was aware of, but now I have to make decisions about.

2016 has been my best year ever on my blog in terms of views, comments and visitors, so many thanks to all of you for your time and contributions here and on social media. My most popular post this year was “Don’t take your laptop home” – I don’t know if that struck a particular chord with people about work-life balance, but I know it’s something I’ve reflected on. I also see that my 5 year old post on the “Professional Development” and “Agile Is Dead” open discussions at DDD Scotland 2011 remains popular. I don’t know which, but either of them are great topics for reflective developers to consider : What does Professional Development mean? and What is Agile?

Looking to 2017

I’m not planning anything quite as dramatic for 2017 as a new job, but I still have some thoughts to share thanks to moving from consultancy development to product development and how things which once seems essential now no longer apply.

I’m also having more of a think about Conway’s Law as friends move into new companies and I reflect on the companies I have worked with. As a technical leader who wants a flexible, resilient software architecture and a passionate, always-learning team, how much can I influence one to affect the other. I’ve got a few thoughts on this, but I’d love to hear from anyone else who’s exploring this, as I’ve got a few bigger ideas here.

And I’d love to keep up 2 blogs a week, playing with styles and topics. Exploring old and new ideas. I’ve got enough topics on my Trello board for 18 months at that pace (including one describing the Trello board). If I manage to carve out the time to do that alongside my other commitments, you’ll see it here.

I don’t do New Year resolutions. It’s always a bad day to start something. Always reflect, always refine. And if you leave it to New Year, you’re only giving yourself 70-odd chances to change. Why limit yourself?

Sláinte

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