My .net journey

With the release of Visual Studio 2017 and .net core, I’ve seen a few folk talking about their story with the platform. This is mine.

I’ve never been the biggest Microsoft fan, ever since I grabbed a copy of Mandrake Linux and figured out how much more tinkering was available and how much more logical certain operations were than on Windows 95. But it was definitely still a tinkerers platform.

But I got an internship at Edinburgh University whilst I was a student there, funded by Microsoft. I got a laptop for the summer and a iPaq (remember that?) to keep. I also got a trip to Amsterdam to meet the other interns and some folk from Microsoft, back before they had much more than sales people in the UK. And they told me, no matter how much anyone hates Microsoft, they always hate Oracle more.

It meant that I was among the first to get the .net 1.0 CD, so I could legitimately claim later that yes, I did have 2 years of .net experience.

But from there, I stayed in Linux, learning the joys of Java Threading on Solaris (top tip : Sun really should have known what they were doing, that they didn’t means I can see some of why they failed – it was far easier working with threads on Red Hat or Windows).

And then I did my PhD, digging into device drivers, DirectX and MFC. I hated Microsoft’s Win32 GUI stuff, but the rest, in C++, was quite nice. I enjoyed being closer to the metal, and shedding the Java ceremony. I trained on templates and started to understand their power. And Java just wasn’t good enough.

I wrote research projects in C++ and data analysis engines in Python. It was good.

But Java came back, and I wrote some media playback for MacOS, and fought iTunes to listen to music. And I vowed never to buy from Apple because both were a right pain.

And I needed a new job. And I’d written bots in IronPython against C#, so I got a .Net job. And I missed the Java and Python communities, the open source chatter. And I wanted to write code in C# that was as beautiful and testable as C++. And I wanted to feel that Bulmer’s Developers! chant was a rallying call, not a lunch order from a corporate monster.

So I found alt.net and it was in Scotland, and I wrote a lot of code, and I learned that open source did exist in c#, and that there was a conference named after that chant and I met more like minded developers. I fought my nervousness and my stumbling voice and I found some confidence to present. And blog. And help write a package manager. And then everyone else learned Ruby.

And then the Scotts joined Microsoft and alt.net became .net. And then LINQ came and I remembered how clean functional programming is, and I started feeling like I was writing Python if I squinted hard, and ignored types. And then core came, and Microsoft had some growing pains. But it’s a sign that the company has completely shifted in the right direction, learning from the guys who left for Ruby. And Node.

I’m proud of what I’ve built in C#, and it’s a much better language than Java, now. It’s definitely the right choice for what I’ve built. The documentation is definitely better than Apple or Sun/Oracle produce, although MSDN and docs.microsoft.com are having some migration pains of its own.

And alt.net is making a comeback.

And I still use Python on hobby projects.

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