Ddd.scot, diversity, and your career

I had a great day at DDD Scotland, thanks to everyone who came along for the discussions. Apart from the panel sessions I chaired and participated in, Joe Wright ran a great mob programming session, Gary Fleming led a lean coffee session, and we had a couple of great lightning talks about recruitment at Skyscanner and Becoming a Technical Lead From Tugberk Ugurlu of Redgrave.

There were a few recurring themes that I want to highlight.

Diversity

This was a strong recurrent theme throughout the sessions in the community room. Whilst the focus was on gender due mostly to the makeup of the attendees, a few people pointed out the need to respect diversity for LGBT, age (graduates don’t have 5 years experience), family circumstances (single parents and others don’t have time in the evenings to do coding interviews), dyslexia and autism. To which I’d also add physical disabilities, skin colour, religion, any of which can and have been used intentionally or otherwise to limit the pool of candidates brought to interview, or created a hostile environment once in the job.

If you want to hire on merit, don’t just give the job to the white guy because he’s “a culture fit” and recognise that your recruitment may be biased. When I put an ad on Stackoverflow, all the replies were men, but working with a couple of recruiters we found a better mix of candidates, including the woman who we ended up hiring.

Job hunting and moving on in your career

There was a scary graph that suggests that computer scientists are less employable that other graduates, and yet of all the STEM subjects, there are more vacancies in software (where the stem jobs are ).

The job market is broken. There’s a lot of smart people out there, and for my last 2 jobs I had no experience in one of the key technologies they were advertising for, so the job adverts in many ways are meaningless. I want to work with people who have the skills to evaluate the next JavaScript framework, not 10 years experience in Vue. Nothing I work on today existed when I graduated. No ASP.NET MVC, no REST, JavaScript was for image rollovers, no Swift, no Xamarin. But job adverts don’t care about ability to learn. They’re a checklist.

I know recruitment agents get a bad reputation, and for some it’s well deserved, but a good one will help you get past the keyword gate, because they can sell you on your potential. If a company isn’t interested in your potential, choose another one. If you don’t want to deal with an agent, you need to be bold, demonstrate what you can for the requirements, and find examples to help them see that you can learn the rest quickly.

But have examples. You don’t want to be the clueless braggard who can’t even FizzBuzz.

Culture of learning, and mentorship

If you want to continue to be successful, you need to learn. Some of it you can do on your own, some you’ll need help with. If you’re working for the right company, they’ll provide you with a mentor, but even if they do, it’s worth finding others to help, whether it’s a formal process, or just someone to discuss if all companies make you deal with that stressful thing that’s getting you down.

Write a blog, volunteer for projects outside your comfort zone that help you improve those skills you’re lacking. Seek feedback. Accept that you won’t know everything and the learning experience is littered with failures. Learn by doing. Pair, mob, spike ideas.

When you’re tired of learning, find a new job.

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