Categories
.net code

Self-testing configuration – the example.config story

Some halloween cakes reflected in a mirror
Mirror image

We’re all good developers and never store production secrets in our source code. We have to keep them somewhere though.

If you’re an ASP.Net developer and you store your secrets in a separate file, how do you check them on release?

In a previous job, we were building an application in AWS EC2, which meant we couldn’t sit on top of the lovely Azure Key Vault/secrets.json workflow, and instead used a secure file drop as part of the deployment. We had a couple of releases that failed because secrets that were available locally weren’t included in the release package, causing the website to fail to start. We didn’t have the nice logging provided by the .Net core configuration objects, so what we did was create configuration documentation in the form on an example.config file that contained all the keys we expected, and populated dummy values. On startup, we’d compare the list of keys in the example.config which did not contain any secrets, with the actual config, and fail the startup with a report of which keys were different so we had a very quick way of checking the config was in sync with expectations.

Categories
security ux wtf

DRM and plastic knifes

image
I tried to do something I wasn't allowed to do but they refused to tell me what I'm not allowed to do.

I thought Digital Rights Management was dying when iTunes no longer required it. I was wrong. It’s sneaking into HTML, it’s in coffee machines, it’s being discussed for JPEG, it’s led to the introduction of boot lockers to prevent users from modifying the operating system on their machine.

So what? Surely copyright holders have the right to protect their content, no matter that the entire music industry could be bought out with Google or Apple’s spare change. Surely they need the money to support the poor struggling up and coming artists, who they can’t afford to pay from streaming revenues. Surely we should just let Hollywood have their way?

And anyway, doesn’t restricting operating systems and the software we can install protect us from the bad guys? Apple will keep us safe in their protected iOS and App Store, right?

When you restrict tools via drm, only the professionals can use the full tools, but where do the next professionals come from? We’re suffering from a shortage of people who want to learn to develop software, and we’re putting extra barriers in place, so that we need specialist devices for teaching development in the form of the Raspberry Pi and others, because the main machines we use are locked down and restricted.

Knives are dangerous and they can kill, so Scotland has restrictions on their sale and carrying them, but we still teach children to cook, sharp knives and tools for sharpening them are still widely available, and you don’t need to be a licenced chef to use a real knife.

If we can trust society enough that we don’t need plastic knives outside preschool, fast food vendors and cheap airlines, why can’t we trust them with access to a fully functional computer?

Categories
development security ux

Losing tokens : 2 factor authentication recovery

Use your palm to sign in
Use your palm to sign in

My phone broke. I lost access to Google Authenticate and the second half of my two factor authentication.

It was a great opportunity to look at how each of the main services deal with recovery. I’m always looking to increase the baseline of security in every new body of work, and 2-Factor authentication is one interesting avenue, but has a big potential failure scenario. I want to look at how the services deal with this to understand the trade offs.

For those of you unfamiliar with the concept, authentication is generally performed by one of 3 factors : something you know (e.g. a password), something you have (e.g. your car key) or something you are (e.g. fingerprints). 2 factor authentication asks you to prove your identity via 2 of these channels, rather than one, and often chooses the something you have and something you know channels because of the difficulty of replacing the something you are channel if the security is compromised.

Most of the services I discuss here use Google Authenticator which uses your phone as the something you have, seeded with a shared secret (usually encoded as a 2d barcode) to generate a new code at regular intervals that should appear random to any observer but always consistent between server and client.

Many of the services use one-time codes to allow you to log in if you lose your device, and some force you to enter one of those codes as part of the verification process. For all those that provide it, print out those codes as soon as you get the option, and keep their printout safe not near your phone.

The services

Google : provides a set of 10 one time codes. An email when any is used. Easy migration process to a new device, automatically disabling the old device.

Github : sends a text to my phone. Not so good for a stolen phone.

WordPress : a set of 10 one time codes, but no email indication, when one is used. Frustratingly I have to disable and re-enable 2FA to move to a new device, rather than WordPress disabling the old device automatically. Although it does have the nice side effect, unlike Google, of emailing me to let me know a new device was added.

Twitter : temporary password, with 1 hour expiry, provided you’re logged in on another device. For most services this should not be a problem, but it’s a good reminder to ensure you always have more than one trusted device for an account so you can create new trust relationships and disable old ones.

Dropbox : can re-enable authenticator via barcode, if logged in on another device. Email is sent.

I like the Google and WordPress approach for simplicity, if you’re organised enough to use paper as you’re backup device, but I’m comfortable with the approach taken by Dropbox and Twitter that use another device for the authentication.

Conclusion

I don’t like the Github approach, because it fails to recognise the use of the phone for multiple purposes, making a phone much more valuable a target. Luckily my phone was bricked, but I continue to monitor my accounts for suspicious activity, just in case it comes back to life now I’ve been sent a replacement.

I like notifications. I get email notifications on multiple devices and as they are timely, I know immediately if there are unexpected changes. Good marks for Google and WordPress here, but I wish Google sent emails for enabling on a new device and WordPress sent emails for use of one time codes.

I prefer the one time code approach for the way I like to work but I can see the benefits of the multiple trusted device approach. I can’t see any benefits to the github recovery approach apart from simplicity.

2 factor authentication is good, but check your recovery strategy now. I only got back into my accounts because I was prepared.

Further reading

★ : Two-Factor Authentication Hacked: Why You Shouldn’t Panic buff.ly/1wukaiE

Be sure you have a backup plan, for Apple and others. I almost lost access to some of my accounts because I misplaced my backup keys, similar to this guy.

If you lose your phone, or are scared you will, have a look at this Lifehacker guide before you enable 2-factor authentication on your accounts.