Categories
development leadership

Get uncomfortable

This blog is about technical topics and being a technical lead. Understanding architecture is part of it, but if you don’t reflect on understanding people then you will never be a leader. I don’t have all the answers but it starts with accepting you can learn from others, and some of what they share will not fit with your current world view. Be ready to tear down and rebuild some foundations if you’re a technical person willing to become a leader. In the spirit of learning I’ve included the original tweets at the bottom for context so you can see the rest of the conversation.

Data needs the right questions

I trust science, so data beats anecdotes, but once I started to listen to people’s stories, I realized the people collecting the data weren’t asking important questions. “How many women applied for this job?” “How many targets of violent crime are gay?” “Are black men targeted by stop and search?” Some of these questions now have better answers, but there’s still a lot of questions that don’t even occur to people to ask.

I learned a lot from my wife in that respect – the importance of qualitative research to make sure you’re asking the right questions. But qualitative is “soft science” so isn’t as well respected, despite being fundamental to getting it right. Sound familiar?

And then you have to ask why the data isn’t collected? Is it a blind spot, or do people earnestly not want to know because then they’d have to face up to uncomfortable truths that their image of themselves does not match how others see them? Our egos are fragile, which is why I have to work hard and compassionately with new developers to understand ego-less code and collective ownership. Vulnerability is hard, especially for men in tech, and that manifests itself in many defensive micro-agressions.

I’m not going to talk about toxic masculinity here, but please go watch The Mask You Live In to hear a US perspective on how “manning up” is creating a toxic environment.

Code needs the right questions

Yeah, code is for solving the problems you know about, but how do you solve the problems you don’t know about?

If someone calls you a snowflake, or an sjw, just for asking a question, there’s a very important reason they don’t want you to ask that question : they’re scared of the answer.

Let’s be clear, science and data matter, otherwise the opinion of some white guy who can’t keep his job at Google is worth as much as someone who has collected, reviewed and summarised all the data. But we all need to be sure that the right data is collected and the right questions are asked.

To be honest, I started down this path because I saw my friends were hurting, and they helped me understand homophobia, and then I started seeing where everyone else was disadvantaged. Having a friend to guide you is the best way to open your eyes.

Why should you change? Because “we’ve always done it this way” is the worst justification for anything. Because if you find out something is broken, it should make you uncomfortable. And if you think nothing is broken then you shouldn’t be writing software and fixing problems.

Make space

This isn’t about feelings, or political correctness or any of that. This is about you doing your job, understanding the domain that the technology you create sits within. It’s about bringing your full self to work, and making sure everyone else on the team has that opportunity too. And if they don’t want to talk about what they did at the weekend, that’s their choice too.

If you can’t make space to accept that other points of view are valid, that technology mediates access and knowledge, and your code will directly impact someone’s ability to access that, you should not be in this industry. Make space for someone who gives a shit about the users, and the wider community affected by every decision you make in every line of code you write and review, and every interaction associated with that code.

Is it exhausting? It can be. Especially at first. But you know what’s really exhausting? Fighting… technology…

Every

Step

Of

The

….

Way.

Don’t accept the status quo

Don’t be the developer that makes their colleagues rage quit. Or makes the users curse their every day stuck because you didn’t ask the right questions.

Did you test your facial recognition on black faces?

Can blind people order pizza on your website?

Is every woman on your team made of regular polygons and has regular periods?

Question everything. The truth is out there if you care to look. Other people should not be alien to you.


Categories
code development programming

Software Development as a Christmas Story

Gingerbread Christmas Tree
Oh Tanenbaum

We decorated the house for Christmas. A smaller project than most of the software I’ve worked on, but a useful reflection.

The Cost of context switching

Sometimes, in the middle of one task, you need to do another. Either because you were interrupted, or because you weren’t prepared. Consider the tree, a tall tree, one you need a ladder to decorate. But you left the 🌟 in the attic.

You don’t just have the cost of picking up the star, you need to get down the ladder, fold it up, carry it upstairs, open the attic, unfold the ladder, climb to the attic, find the star, then pick it up and unwind all the other steps just to get back where you stated before you can continue the task of putting the Star on the tree.

It’s just a minute to get the star…

Yak shaving

Sometimes it’s more than just one thing. Sometimes to get to where you need to go, there’s a cascade of other tasks.

You want to put the tree up, but it’s the first time you’ve had a real tree, so you need a new base. It’s bigger than last year’s tree, so your lights don’t fit. So you need to go to the shops. But you need to fill up your car. And the tyre pressure warning light comes on so you need to top them up. And you need to check the tread depth whilst you’re there, and so on.

Programming in a nutshell

Performance at scale

Our tree stood up fine when it was delivered. But as it scaled out and the branches widened, it pushed against the wall, making it unstable in the condensed space. It fell over.

Luckily no lights or baubles were using it at the time, but it’s an interesting challenge holding up a heavy tree in one hand, trying to adjust it’s position with the other hand, as I avoided the puddles of water in the floor as my wife mopped them up. If you’ve ever worked support, this may sound familiar.

Turns out that it was harder to stabilise than I anticipated.

The branches were unevenly partitioned, providing more load on one side, so I had to stabilise it against the wall. And the tree was almost a foot taller than expected, which turned it out to be 2 foot taller than the base was rated for.

We upgraded the base to handle the load. It’s bigger than we need.

Technical debt

I have some old pre-LED tree lights and they slowly fail so each year I replace the unlit ones from the packet of spares but I haven’t been replacing the spares. Eventually, they will run out, and the spares will no longer be available. I’ll have to throw them all out and start again.

The new led ones don’t let me replace them individually. But they last longer and are cheaper to run.

Which debt is easier to live with?

With a big tree, those old lights aren’t long enough. So, do I buy another set for the rest of the tree that doesn’t match them, or throw out the existing ones and buy a longer set? The latter looks better, but throws out the sunk cost along with the lights.

You know computers, can you look at this for me?

No, I can’t fix your tree. I can navigate a garden centre. I know enough physics to keep a tree upright, eventually, and safely put the angel on, but I’ve no Idea how to grow one, or what that weird stand with 17 gears you bought does, or how to assemble your plastic one. And I’ve no idea what that bug in the tree is.

Merry Christmas. Catch you all in the New Year.

Categories
development leadership

Sometimes the greatest challenge of leadership is making your boss understand what you do all day

Everyone loves a maverick. The one who bends the rules, who gets the job done. Who leaves fireworks in his wake (it’s always a man) and doesn’t mind breaking a few chickens to make an omelette. The people who rescue the projects in a tailspin, who shout loud and carry a big stick.

What happens to the projects without fireworks? The sysadmins that don’t have to explain why they got breached? The project managers who don’t have to explain why they went over budget? The developers who aren’t in the office past midnight fixing bugs? The people who aren’t visible because they fix the problems before they become visible?

I grew up watching Formula 1 with my dad, in the era of Senna and Mansell. Senna was fiery, pushed the car to the limits, exciting to watch. Mansell was controlled, steady, hitting the right line, and easing the car in as if it was on rails. Senna looked like the hardest worker, but Mansell broke his run of world championships.

If you’re competent, if you get the job done, then people believe that your job must be easy. It’s not easy to beat a triple world champion. Sometimes you need to anchor your achievements in advance, so people understand the challenge in hindsight, especially if you are marginalized in the workforce such that your achievements are minimised.

The Difficulty Anchor

It’s even harder once you move into any management role, success is due to your team (and be damn proud of that success), but failure falls squarely on your shoulders. If you don’t have a strong sense of your own self worth, it can hollow you out, and leave you with nothing but a thick skin.

Take on extra responsibilities, be the consistency for the team when the powers above you are a maelstrom of confusion and musical chairs. And nothing happens.

Remove obstacles and no-one sees them.

Anchor your team’s success. Quiet, dependable successes make everyone on the team happy : no drama, no overtime. But it can be hard to show the work behind the scenes that makes it look so smooth.

It’s not just a dev problem, a good sys admin is invisible, designers struggle to prove their worth (How to Prove Your Design’s Value – Hack Design
https://hackdesign.org/lessons/57-how-to-prove-your-design-s-value?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=howtoproveyourdesignsvalue ).

Market yourself. I know you hate sales and marketing, you’re happy to leave it to others, but you need to give yourself the confidence to be proud of your achievements and make sure people understand what you did. Share it with your boss and your peers (you’ll need some recognition when it comes to your appraisal). Promoting yourself is not someone else’s job. Practice it. Embrace it. Be proud.

Categories
development leadership

Measuring the wrong thing

Process improvement requires measurements. How do you know what to improve if you can’t see where things aren’t working, and how do you know you’ve made the right change without seeing those numbers going in the right direction?

But measuring doesn’t mean you’re measuring the right thing, and measuring the wrong thing can lead to the wrong outcomes, and can be very harmful (see Liz Keogh’s talk on perverse incentives )

The key to the success of any metric is that it is owned by the team so they have complete control over the changes needed to affect it, so they feel ownership, and that improving the metric has a useful business outcome.

Metrics that I’ve found useful in the past include:

Number of bugs introduced by a release.

This is a tricky one to work with because it can easily be a perverse incentive, and the feedback cycle can be slow, especially with the usual 6-12 month release cadence. However, on one waterfall project I took over there was a strong negative perception of the quality of the code, and big count was a useful proxy as the customer had access to JIRA so the big list was already visible. Reducing this number was a combined effort where testers and developers had to approve requirements, developers and testers invested in automated testing at all levels, and testers joined the developer daily stand-up in order to catch bugs before they were released “have you checked that page in Welsh?“, “We found problems on that page last time because IE was too slow“.

Number of releases per month.

On an agile project we noticed that releases were getting held up because testing was slow and produced a lot of rework, which were then tested against more features that had been pulled from the backlog, increasing testing time. Each release also took half a day, so we had to schedule them carefully.

So we set a goal of focusing on releases for a month and measuring how many we did. There were other measures within that, such as monitoring work in progress on the testers, time taken to do a release, and cycle time from start of development to live release, but they all drove the big number, visible to the whole company, of more quality releases.

Questions answered per day.

This can be a very useful metric for research projects, especially when following a fail fast approach, when you want to prove something can’t be done before you invest in doing it. In order to do that, you need lots of questions with quick answers, to accelerate learning. Any answer, positive or negative, is progress. It means we have learned something.

“I cheerily assured him that we had learned something.
For we had learned for a certainty that the thing couldn’t be done
that way, and that we would have to try some other way.” – Thomas Edison

Age of Pull Requests

Successful agile projects rely on peer review, either via pairing, or a formal review process such as git PRs (and I won’t discuss that in this post). However, when we started working with these on one project, we discovered that we were building up a large debt of Work In Progress because the team wasn’t incentivised to review each other’s code, so one of the developers set up a nag bot for any PR older than 4 days. It lasted 2 weeks before it was no longer needed.

What about you?

What metrics have you used to incentivise the team? What problem were you trying to solve, and did the metric work?

Categories
leadership

Sense and Respond by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden

Sense and Respond: How Successful Organizations Listen to Customers and Create New Products ContinuouslySense and Respond: How Successful Organizations Listen to Customers and Create New Products Continuously by Jeff Gothelf

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Having read Lean UX, I was expecting a good book on how organisations could deliver projects. This book is about much more than that. The authors are coming from a point of frustration where agile delivery and Lean UX projects have failed to reach their potential because the organisations surrounding them were not supportive, so this book is about how to reshape an entire organisation to meet the challenged of the modern world, with lots of positive and negative examples, which is refreshing to see in this type of book. If you’ve ever had a strategy meeting, or ever found your project success limited by your organisation, go read this book.

Easily the best book about dysfunctional organisations and organisational change I’ve read since Peopleware.

View all my reviews

Buy on Amazon UK :

Categories
code development

Demotivated by refactoring

Technical debt causes drag. It slows down new features and lengthens the half life of a project (Erik Bernhardsson talks about projects with a code half-life measured in years, but Sandi Metz talks about projects with a half life of 6 weeks on her Chainline mailing list – go sign up now). We all know the benefit of doing it and development teams fight to get time to do it.

But it’s not the most exciting work. Dealing with debt can easily demotivate a team fired up by new challenges and new features, even when they see the benefit. Yak shaving doesn’t get innovators out of bed.

Sometimes the motivation comes from seeing the next step, 2 days refactoring so that this new feature can be delivered faster. Sometimes it’s a negative motivation, fix this and you’ll never have to worry about it again.

But for teams driven by delivering business value, taking time away from that to naval gaze at the code stacks up the guilt, and can tire the team out faster than a crunch, because there’s no adrenaline to go around. That’s because often the goal of refactoring isn’t enabling functionality, it’s unlocking efficiency, and that’s a less tangible goal. Why go through the pain when other tasks show more short term benefit for less work?

For one, the team has to be motivated by medium and long term goals rather than just short term. Not just what can be done this sprint, but what code do we want to work with next year? For another, refactoring in general should be small enough that the next business value task is on the horizon, and directly linked to the success of the current task. Or maybe there’s a personal reward. The team appreciates the work and so is happy to cover your support shift. They all agree that you get off pager duty for the length of the task plus a week.

When yak shaving is a drag, how do you keep motivated?

Categories
development ux

Always be finished

I’ve been living on a building site for a while, at home and at work. The work at the office above ours was ambitious, chaotic, noisy, messy and overran. It was a challenging project, turning a “derilict” into a funky new office.

Home was a simpler proposition, a greenfield site, with a well tuned team putting up a batch of similar houses. Each house in the project was a clear finishing point. The work was completed on or near budget, although there have been many bugs in the finished product. Nothing to break the deal, but enough to be annoying, and a few that need serious attention before things get worse.

The most interesting thing for me however was complete the overall project looks. At each stage the customer perception is paramount, so roads and car parks are built and finished in places where in a few months they’ll be ripped up to put houses on because that’s the most central place to put the marketing suite so customers can see their house quicker.

And the perfectly manicured lawns at the show home will be ripped up to build a driveway for the garage. And the landscaped street gables get cut back to move the marketing suite. But at each stage there’s a clear “here’s what’s being built” and “here’s the rest” even when what looks complete is not the final vision.

The perception even extends to certain rules for residents to ensure consistent façades and a complete presentation, with no unsightly trade vans, for the entire site until the last one is sold.

When you build software, how finished do the “temporary” solutions look to the customer and the developers. Do they look hacked on, unreliable and in desperate need of a bug fix, or do they look finished and smooth to the end user, with a few backlog tickets describing what it really should do. No hint to users or competitors that something is about to change.

It’s not enough for everything you release to be complete and tested. If users can see the cracks, it will colour their impressions. Fix the snags and delight your users.

Categories
development

Naughtonomy

wp-1450118461565.jpg
Wherever the wind takes you

If you want a strong team of developers, give them autonomy. But what if they don’t want to take it? The ones in, or from, the big corporations who just won’t take the initiative? The ones who just want to be told what to do?

I’ve said before that those are the waterfall people. The cogs in the machine.

Have you been a developer who didn’t want to take responsibility for yourself or your work? Who doesn’t have pride in your work, and just wants the money? Do you want the opposite of autonomy?

It might not be your fault. If you live in a blame culture, you want to leave as small a footprint as possible. Head down, do as you’re told. Don’t attempt that risky refactoring or upgrade. After all, if you do it, and it breaks, it’s your bonus that gets lost, and your neck on the line for big failures. If you don’t touch it, and it breaks, maybe the previous touchee will get passed the grenade, or maybe it will just get blamed on a faceless, incomplete “process”.

Maybe your manager doesn’t want you making decisions. You’re not important enough. You don’t have the power to make them. Developer ideas don’t matter, listen to the manager, or the architect.

Or maybe you want to be motivated, to get autonomy and change things.

Show your boss this. Or get a new job.

Categories
code development programming

Why I prefer pessimistic merging

Even though I trust my team.

As a technical lead, I think code reviews are essential to ensuring the quality of the code. On a project I worked on, due to changes in Project Management, I ended up switching between code reviews as standard and code reviews by exception, and in every case, releases delivered with code reviews baked in had fewer bugs, and were far more likely to meet deadlines.

I believe that code reviews done after integration have roughly the same benefit on these metrics as no code reviews at all. Although this guy prefers optimistic merging, I’m not convinced, and I think pessimistic merging is the only way to review code, especially when automated testing and static analysis are part of the review process.

However, my experience is with working with small-ish, cohesive teams, rather than open source projects seeking new contributors, so please bear that context in mind.

  • It’s easier to fix problems pre-merge;
  • Blockages pre-merge are far easier to detect (kanban!) – fix the bottleneck, don’t break the process;
  • Code reviews are the process by which the team takes ownership of the code;
  • The code remains continuously shippable;
  • Each code review is a checkpoint for discussion, and segways into refactoring and other improvements.
Categories
development

Accessible for everyone

I don’t know if you’re familiar with Isofix child seats, but you spend all your time figuring out how to fit it correctly in one car, then you have to switch to another car and it just doesn’t seem to fit the same way. (Browser manufacturers, take note).

A safely fitted child seat has green flashes that appear to show that the seat is locked into position, and they’re easy to check by inserting your eyeballs in the 3cm between the edge of the seat and the car frame (I admit this is slightly easier in a 5-door car where the frame is removable via a hinge).

For those without detachable eyeballs, this can be a challenge.

But the car seat we have has a nice little accessible touch. The green flashes are hook shaped, and recess into the seat when the seat is unlocked, so if I can feel a hook on the side of the seat, I know that the seat is securely locked.

I don’t know if the designer deliberately chose to make the safety catch non-visually accessible, but I am very grateful that they did. It has saved me a lot of sore heads and worry.

I assume that the designer in question was not the genius who decided that websites with infinite scrolling should have footers. *scroll down* ah, site map *click* *new content loads* *wrong page opens*. That designer should find a bothy somewhere and stay away from computers for the sake of everyone else.

Be accessible. Looking snazzy is one thing, but if you really want to be appreciated, think about the little touches that make the interactions wonderful, and make something that’s otherwise impossible, easy.