Categories
code development programming

How I approach coding challenges

This time last year I was doing a lots of tests for job interviews, and I was practicing with https://adventofcode.com

I know there’s various data structures and algorithms you can learn to make these easier (and I hope to come back to some of my favourites in a later post), but there’s a general approach I take to these that helps me, and might help some of you too.

Use TDD

I’ve always been a fan of Test-Driven Development, and these type of puzzles lend themselves well to TDD thinking. Often examples are provided that will form the initial test suite. The algorithm is often broken into steps (sometimes explicitly “On every clock tick…”)

Get into the habit of checking as you go to make the most of the information provided to you. Think about the problem first, and the mapping between the input and the output, before you write any code.

Check everything on simple solutions.

Have templates

Most challenges involve a few common tasks. Read input from a file (ignoring blank lines), create a list of…, output as CSV, etc.

Some of these will have standardised patterns in your chosen language, and you should use them. Some will likely require some error handling. Some will require loading from standard or 3rd party libraries. And all will require a test framework.

As you go, build up a utilities list of functions, classes and packages that you know how to use, are robust enough and have minimal clutter. They’re not meant to be usable by anyone but you, but you will use them a lot. Collect and cherish them.

Think simple

Technical tests and coding challenges, in general, are designed to have short, easy solutions. If you need to solve P == NP to make your code fast, it’s likely you’re using an algorithm that’s a poor fit. Find 2 other ways to solve the problem, and pick the simpler one.

Simpler than that

Think about the simplest solution that could possibly work and write it simply.
Make the code readable. This is not the time for clever solutions. When it fails on an input, make it easy to change.

But not that simple

You still need to think about edge cases, and memory usage, and a myriad of other resource constraints. Think about what could go wrong, within the confines of the puzzle. Advent of Code has a particular knack for detecting edge cases in your code for Part 2 of each day’s challenge.

Think fast

Beware of premature optimisation, but expect long inputs and many loops if you use the naive implementation. Learn new algorithms and data structures.

Categories
development leadership

CodeCraftConf 2018 : Successfully Growing A Team

Thanks to everyone who came to my CodeCraftConf session today, and to the organisers for all their hard work. Here’s the questions I asked, and I’ll follow up with my thoughts from the discussion.

Successfully Growing A Team

  1. When is it time to grow your team?
  2. How do you deal with resistance from existing team members?
  3. Is it more important to find a culture fit or build a diverse team?
  4. What is your biggest worry with your current team size, or with growing your current team?
  5. How frequently can you add new people to your team?
  6. How long does it take to integrate someone new?
  7. What practices do you use to ensure sustainable growth?
  8. How do you know when a team is too big?
  9. How do you split a team that’s grown too big?
  10. How do you grow a team when the existing members are already overworked?
  11. How long is your recruitment pipeline in terms of short-term planning (getting people in the door) and long-term planning (having the right team in place for next year or 5 years?
  12. How do you recruit outside your specialty?
Categories
development

How do you know when it’s time to move job?

Around 18 months ago, I decided I needed a new job. It took almost 8 months to find my current job, and I swayed between wanting to leave and wanting to stay. In the end I discovered that I was finding excuses to stay because I’d been there long enough, and made enough friends, to be scared of leaving. But the company I left was a very different company to the one I joined.

If you’re starting the new year after some time off, starting to fear going back, or having doubts about your job, have a think about these things, and see where you stand. Then decide if you want to stick or shift.

Some of these are things I’ve felt, others are ones that came up from multiple people in recruitment interviews I’ve done over the last few years.

  • You don’t see yourself here in 5 years
  • You have more direction than your company
  • You’ve lost sight of, or respect for, the company values
  • You do all your learning, and all your best work, out of the office
  • The idea of doing the same thing next year fill you with dread. But it’s exactly what you expect
  • You’re ready for the next step, but you can’t see where that step is.
  • Your team, or your company, is shrinking, and no plans for growth are forthcoming.

What’s made you switch jobs?

Categories
development leadership

Bootstrapping new developers

Dawn behind the trees
Start of a new day

When things are tough, do them often, to get more practice, as Sky Betting discuss in their recent blog post. It’s certainly something that I’ve noticed as we’ve moved to more regular releases, more regular planning and reducing feedback cycles.

One big thing I’m still learning how to do, where that doesn’t apply, is adding new developers to a team. I’ve been thinking about this after hearing The Improv Effect talk about onboarding to a company on .Net Rocks 1253 : Onboarding is Culture with Jessie Shternshus

My usual approach doesn’t apply, because good teams are stable, so onboarding is rare, which makes it harder to know how to bring new people on to the team. I always try to write a short introduction, on a wiki, to introduce the project and list the useful urls, and the getting started steps, and I ask new developers to update it with any differences they find, to keep it up to date.

Most of the team knowledge doesn’t come from there. It comes from the rest of the team. So the team needs to be built so that the onboardee collaborates with other members of the team from day one. Getting involved in code reviews, asking questions. I’m sometimes tempted to give as little information as possible to encourage asking questions, but that’s not how psychology works, and I’ve had more than a few gotcha moments where someone who’s been on the team for a while says “I didn’t know that was there” or “oh, so that’s why we do it that way”, and I have to revisit the onboarding story again, and wait for the next chance to validate it.

So, assuming your company has a good story for onboarding employees, how to you take a fresh start, or a start from another project, and build them into your team?

Categories
development

#DunDDD follow up recruitment discussion Thursday 29th November : What should companies offer?

Many thanks to everyone who attended the #DunDDD open discussion on recruitment.

I would like to follow up the discussion we had about what interviewees should do with an online discussion about what employers should do. This will be held on Google+ on Thursday 29th at 7pm. See here for details and to sign up : https://plus.google.com/events/c5ta56ljcmkon5rsdkc0ttu54kg

For those who couldn’t make it, the midmap is available here:

Recruitment in the IT industry Mindmapmind map: Recruitment in the IT industryMind Mapping – MindMeister.
Create your own mind maps at MindMeister

Categories
code development programming

DunDDD : What do you think about recruitment in the IT industry?


I’ve been invited to run a group discussion on recruitment at DunDDD, and to kick off the thinking, I want to know what topics you want to discuss, either as a job hunter, or looking for staff. What do you think about interview techniques, probation periods and recruitment agencies? What, apart from salary, do you look for in your job? What do you think schools, universities and employers should be doing but aren’t?

Give me your thoughts below, or email me (via Gmail or a twitter pm) or bring your comments to Dundee at 9am Saturday. These sessions can be lively so make sure you have a coffee and get there early to get a seat.

If you can’t make it, I’ll put up some notes at some point next week.

Hope to see you all there.